About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. and now, i'm about to get married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully to the same guy. [laughter] don't forget that. >> you don't gets gifts every time either. that's the problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal thing in that so i was very pleasantly surprised on that side and i do think that also, i want to look at this, but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the prior polling in the actual voting wasn't as big as it has in the pass which past which suggests to the extent that people were saying kind of different things to survey takers than they were, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling rejected that which was the margin and we won by the margin close to the polling. i think if that is true that is very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to have to feel that we had to really get very high numbers. and so that was good news. >> i was
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
. panetta has been working on these issues for quite some time with you and the area in central california. by the way, thank you for support on the veterans skills jon that was assigned this week into the law a good bipartisan effort that we worked on. after our afghanistan try and another issue that came up during the same trip was working with our veterans that on the active duty with the general bostick afterwards he had said that this is the number one issue the evaluation process before they get discharged making sure not a day goes by that they are having to wait for disability or the issue of 20,000 non-deployable men and women that are disabled on active duty, so he said was the number-one issue dealing with the legislative issue that needs to be fixed back in 1940 and the question that i would have to you is what can we get done and what would be your recommendation and what is the legislative fix that you need us to pass the would help with this overall disability evaluation system? >> my view is that one of the most important things we can do is address the wounded warriors and
, places like southern california and the seattle area where boeing -- and also in missouri where they build some of the military aircraft. but it's the minority of the states in the country. and the notion that this spreads all over the place is not borne up by the few actual surveys that have been done. the pentagon was forced to do some years ago a study on subcontracting, and they found that these main areas where the prime contracts were also received many of the subcontracts. so i think there is more of a concentration of pentagon spending than would be suggested. and then in the areas like virginia where senator mccain, senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire, senator lindsey graham of south carolina, you know, took the scare tour and talked about shipbuilding, talked about military bases, talked about defense consulting firms in northern virginia, um, that argument didn't fly in the elections even though they tried to pin these potential effects on president obama. he carried virginia. and i think the reason for that is that the potential effects were not as deep as advertis
and california. they make the decisions. the politics you see on the media which they own and manipulate and make believe the two parties which are really one party, the donkeys face an elephant face, and i am running to reveal the truth about all of these so we can deal with reality instead of the fake democracy. sanders: it's the economy. we have almost 15% of working people in this country that are either unemployed or underemployed and 50 million people with no health insurance and median family income has gone down by some $4,000 in the last ten years. i am going to work very hard to continue my efforts for the millions of jobs that our country desperately needs by rebuilding our infrastructure and putting a whole lot of people back to work building the roads and the water systems and the bridges. we've got to transform our energy system away from fossil fuel, energy efficiency and sustainable energy when you do that you create a lot of jobs and we need to free think our disastrous trade policies which have led to the outsourcing of millions of jobs and we have to take on wall street and get
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8